Announcements – Religion Calendar

‘Global Grace to “Every Tribe and Language” ’
Mount Olive Lutheran Church (3045 Chicago Ave. S.–corner of 31st Street and Chicago Avenue) is pleased to host an exhibit of the artworks of Kirsten Malcolm Berry. Twelve of Kirsten’s latest works, drawn from New Testament texts, are on display in the Chapel Lounge and West Assembly areas. Her beautiful, intricate designs are painted in light-colored hues using water colors on paper. Texts written in Greek are incorporated into the designs, with the English versions presented underneath.
You can see examples of her work online at  kmb@KirstenMalcolmBerry.com, but go look in person if you can. The show will be up until Ash Wednesday, March 6.
Malcolm Berry says this about her work:
My work is drawn from the images of the New Testament. Integrated into each painting is the verse on which it is based, written in Greek. The Greek links viewers to the original form of the text and its unfamiliar script hints at God’s global grace to “every tribe and language.”The configurations of repeated shapes reflect the influence of several indigenous art forms.
The daughter of Presbyterian missionaries, I grew up in the Philippines and was exposed to the decorative use of patterns on Filipino and other Southeast Asian fabrics and basketry. Geometric woolen tapestries of my Scandinavian heritage have also affected my sense of design, as have Native American weaving, Hmong reverse appliqué, traditional quilts and Byzantine mosaics.

The exercise of faith is difficult for those of us who long for perceptible signs of God’s presence. I paint the images of the Bible to help me translate the abstract into the tangible. Through pictures I grasp that the Word indeed became flesh, and in resurrection power is present even now in the Comforter. And is that not him behind the glimmers of new creation we see each day?
Technical Information: I begin each image in pencil on cotton rag paper. With a small brush, I follow with watercolors, using pigments mixed to a thicker consistency than is typical for most watercolorists. After applying all the color, I erase the pencil lines. Forty to fifty hours are spent on each painting. The framed size of each piece is 26” x 26”; actual image size is 16” x 16”.
 The exhibit is open Monday through Friday during church office hours, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday after services, which are held at 8 and 10:45 a.m.
Mount Olive is a church that combines a passion for the fine arts with a passion for serving the community. The congregation offers two free community meals each month, first and third Saturdays at noon. Mount Olive was also one of the places that opened its doors to anyone who needed shelter during the days of sub-zero temperatures.

EVENTS

Philip

Brunelle’

Shelter Dinner Servers Needed
The Our Saviour’s Housing Emergency Shelter is home to 40-45 adults during the winter. By providing a dinner, you can give its residents not only a filling and nutritious meal, but also hospitality and comfort. A good meal offers residents physical and emotional strength for the next day.
Who can participate?
Groups of 3-10 people are welcome, whether it be family, colleagues, friends, or congregation members. Children starting at age 5 are welcome to volunteer with strong adult supervision. Contact Our Saviour’s for current openings.
If you can’t organize an entire group but want to volunteer on your own, talk with the volunteer coordinator. This can be arranged!
What do I have to provide?
Each group provides a hearty dinner for 50 people plus your meal servers. The meal you serve is up to you! We only ask that it be nutritious and filling for hungry adults, and that it include a sufficient meat-free option for vegetarians. Our Saviour’s has a list of suggestions if you want ideas. Both homemade and store/restaurant-bought food are welcome. Volunteers are also asked to provide disposable plates and napkins.
What is the experience like?
Volunteers at Our Saviour’s speak highly of their experience at the shelter and most are eager to return. Because the shelter is small and community-oriented, we welcome and encourage you to eat dinner alongside our residents and enjoy their company.
We’ll provide detailed information before you come so the evening can go smoothly. When you first arrive, our staff will show you to the kitchen and help you get settled in. Some groups choose to do all of their cooking on-site; others do most of the prep work at home and just use our kitchen for reheating and finalizing. We have a full kitchen equipped with supplies, a commercial oven/stove, and a dishwasher.
When it’s time to eat (7 p.m.), you will dish up the meal for everyone. You are then encouraged to sit down with residents and visit for as long as you’d like.
After the meal, your group is responsible for cleaning up the kitchen, putting away all food, and loading the dishwasher. Most groups spend about 2-3 hours on-site.
Questions? Ready to schedule a dinner?
Contact Tamara Patton, Volunteer Coordinator, at
volunteer@oshousing.org or 612-872-4193 x2.


Space is Available
If you are looking for a place to hold meetings or markets or concerts or family get-togethers, consider a church in your neighborhood. You might pay a small fee and develop some new partnerships. St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in St. Paul, at Howell and Laurel, for example, is a very beautiful old church (from 1895) with an inner courtyard garden and a warm sanctuary with a 9-foot grand piano. They are very open to sharing their space with neighbors as are the churches in your neighborhood. Something to think about.


Support for the Franklin/Hiawatha Encampment
If you are interested in learning more about the Franklin/Hiawatha encampment and ways to support the people, visit https://www.franklinhiawathacamp.org/, managed by Metropolitan Urban Indian Directors.


Healing Minnesota Stories
Healing Minnesota Stories is a program of the Minnesota Council of Churches. “[It] is an effort to create understanding and healing between Native American and non-Native people, particularly those in various faith communities. Native people have suffered deep trauma over many years, losing their land, language and culture, and all who call Minnesota home are the lesser for it. While many people and institutions contributed to that trauma, it happened with the full participation of Christian churches. We all still need healing, healing is doable and churches have a role to play in healing.
We believe in the power of healing stories. Stories heal because they make invisible pain visible. The listener and storyteller are both healed by their acts.
“Churches and all faith communities can play a key role in promoting and experiencing healing by opening ourselves to our own history and listening to the stories of Native people. Through the sharing and retelling of old traumatic stories, we can create new positive ones.
“This effort began in 2012 and continues to bring together Native and non-Native people to share stories and increase awareness of the value of American Indian language, culture and our shared history.
“We can play a role in promoting and experiencing healing by opening ourselves to our own history and listening to the stories of Native people. Healing Minnesota Stories offers ‘Sacred Sites Tours’ that facilitate this interaction.”
There is no cost for the tour, but a freewill offering is appreciated. Contributions for individuals are invited in the range of $30 – $50. Donations support Healing Minnesota Stories programs and events. Space is limited to 40 people. Google Healing Minnesota Stories for more information.


The Summit Lighthouse
Mark Prophet was the founder of the New Age movement The Summit Lighthouse. Growing up in the 1930s and ’40s, Prophet considered his master to be Jesus. Later he believed that his life was guided by Ascended Masters, including Jesus. He opened his heart, mind and soul to a master from the tradition of the Far East, Morya, who led him in the rigors of discipleship. In 1957 Prophet published dictations from El Morya, “Pearls of Wisdom,” and The Summit Lighthouse movement was born. After his death, his work was carried on by his wife, Elizabeth Clare Prophet. The fundamental principle of the teachings of the Ascended Masters is that all sons and daughters of God have a divine spark inside themselves, which is their potential to realize the universal Christ within and ascend to God as Jesus did. The Minneapolis/St. Paul Community Teaching Center of The Summit Lighthouse at 6035 Nicollet Ave. S. holds worship meetings every Sunday morning from 10 to 11:30. The sanctuary is very interior, warmly lit and filled with images and statues of Ascended Masters from many different traditions.


Faith and Food Production
In summer, the Gandhi Mahal Interfaith Garden holds Open Garden Night (weather permitting) every second and fourth Sunday, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at 3201 22nd Ave. S. The gatherings are welcoming and informal. Live music happens often, and light refreshments are always served amidst garden tours and good conversation. Stop on by, and bring a friend!
The Gandhi Mahal Interfaith Garden was created to address food production issues—What are we going to eat in 20 years? Who will have access to food? What will the earth produce? Will it be enough? Will it be safe? It is a collaboration between Gandhi Mahal Restaurant; First Nations Kitchen, a ministry of All Saints Episcopal Indian Mission; and Minnesota Interfaith Power & Light, which mobilizes Minnesota’s faith communities to address climate change.


The Dream Continues
In August 2017, the leaders of the four historic black denominations in Minnesota called together the heads of Minnesota’s Mainline Protestant, Evangelical and Catholic communions for a listening session to address the unmitigated racial division that exists within the Minnesota Christian community, as well as the resurgence of hate crimes and divisive rhetoric, both in Minnesota and in the nation. The black leaders invited their white peers to embark upon a reparative process of learning, reform and healing.
From this historic gathering was launched a black-led initiative to rid the Christian Church in Minnesota of racism and white supremacy. At the lead are the Historic Black Church leaders, Bishop Richard D. Howell, Jr. (Pentecostal Assemblies of the World); Rev. Dr. Billy G. Russell (Minnesota State Baptist Convention); Presiding Elder Stacey L. Smith (African Methodist Episcopal Church) and Bishop Fred W. Washington (Church of God in Christ), with support from Rev. Richard Coleman of Hope United CDC. The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota Council of Churches, and Transform Minnesota are partners in this ongoing initiative.
A community worship service honoring the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination will be held at 7:30 p.m., Friday, May 11, at the Basilica of Saint Mary, 88 – 17th St. N., Mpls. 55403. The event will focus on Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King’s final sermon, “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop.” Fifty years ago, Dr. King declared in his “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” sermon, “Nothing would be more tragic than to stop at this point … We’ve got to see it through.” The Dream Continues.
(This worship service was originally planned for April 3, but a major snowstorm called for a postponement.)


Volunteer Opportunity
Help kids learn to read by becoming a volunteer tutor in elementary schools for the 2017-2018 school year. Volunteers with Reading Partners Twin Cities make a lifelong impact on children who struggle with reading. Give as little as one hour a week; flexible weekday times are available. Follow a highly effective, structured and easy-to-use curriculum; no formal teaching experience is required. Website: readingpartners.org. Email: volunteerTC@readingpartners.org.


Lutheran Blind Center
The Lutheran Blind Center was started April 23, 2016, at Faith Evangelical Lutheran Church, 3430 E. 51st St. On the second Saturday of every month blind people of the Minneapolis area are invited to Faith Church for a two-hour event, from 12 to 2 p.m., that includes a meal, Bible study and fellowship free of charge.
Help is needed. Please consider getting a group from your church or several friends together to help with this project. Please call Carol M. Zemke at 612-799-5782 to help or participate as a guest. Or call Faith Lutheran Church at 612-729-5463. Reservations are requested.


Space is Available
If you are looking for a place to hold meetings or markets or concerts or family get-togethers, consider a church in your neighborhood. You might pay a small fee and develop some new partnerships. St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in St. Paul, at Howell and Laurel, for example, is a very beautiful old church (from 1895) with an inner courtyard garden and a warm sanctuary with a 9-foot grand piano. They are very open to sharing their space with neighbors as are the churches in your neighborhood. Something to think about.


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