Polly Mann

Essays by Polly Mann

Click this image to read Polly Mann’s Easy Essays

I was born Nov. 19, 1919, in the little town of Lonoke, Ark., and spent my growing-up years in Hot Springs, Ark. After high school I got a job in the Transportation Section of the Quartermaster’s Office (U.S.Army) in Little Rock. During my couple of years there I watched bayonet practice and troop trains depart for the war in Germany (very sobering experiences).  As a result I became a pacifist and that belief guided the rest of my life.  I married a military draftee, a young lawyer from Minnesota, who shortly was sent by the military to a base in New Guinea. I then got a job with the U.S. government and went to Ecuador and Peru for a couple of years. When the war was over, my husband, Walter, and I lived in Minnesota where he practiced law and eventually was appointed judge. We (Walter and I and our four children) lived in Windom and Marshall. Upon his retirement we moved to the Twin Cities. He died in 2004. When we came to Minneapolis, a friend and I started an organization, Women Against Military Madness, which has 1,000 members, one staff person and a newsletter editor and is going strong. Today I write occasional articles for the newsletter, see my friends and enjoy retirement.

 

A Portrait of Polly Mann: a 53 minute documentary, part of her 1988 run for the U S Senate

Polly Mann on Leadership:  a 30 minute interview of Polly on the Mary Hanson show, 2002

 

 


FROM WHERE I STAND: Good news

BY POLLY MANN The New York Times headline of Dec. 14 read, “The Pentagon Is Not a Sacred Cow.” Of course it isn’t, and our readers know it and so do we, but for the Times to acknowledge that is like finding a shoveled path to navigate after a winter…

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FROM WHERE I STAND: Short observations

BY POLLY MANN CEO pay may not be quite as high as it once was, but the numbers still dwarf the pay earned by the typical worker. Chief executives of America’s 350 largest companies made an average of $15.6 million in 2016, or 271 times more than what the typical worker…

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